Baz Luhrmann – Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)

A single released by Australian director Baz Luhrmann (Strictly Ballroom, Romeo & Juliet, Moulin Rouge). He reads a newspaper column written in 1997 by Mary Schmich. An excellent example of how to live without regret.

Ladies and gentlemen of the class of ’99
“Wear sunscreen”
If I could offer you only one tip for the future, “sunscreen” would be it.
The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience.
I will dispense this advice NOW!

-Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth. Oh, never mind.
You will not understand the power and beauty of your youth until they’ve faded.
But trust me, in 20 years, you’ll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can’t grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as fat as you imagine.

-Don’t worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum.
The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 pm on some idle Tuesday.

-Do one thing every day that scares you.

-Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts. Don’t put up with people who are reckless with yours.
-Don’t waste your time on jealousy. Sometimes you’re ahead, sometimes you’re behind. The race is long and, in the end, it’s only with yourself.
-Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults.
If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.
-Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements.
-Don’t feel guilty if you don’t know what you want to do with your life.
The most interesting people I know didn’t know at 22 what they wanted to do with their lives. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds I know still don’t.
-Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees. You’ll miss them when they’re gone.
-Maybe you’ll marry, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll have children, maybe you won’t.
Maybe you’ll divorce at 40. Maybe you’ll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary.
-Whatever you do, don’t congratulate yourself too much, or berate yourself either.
Your choices are half chance. So are everybody else’s.
-Enjoy your body. Use it every way you can.
Don’t be afraid of it or of what other people think of it.

It’s the greatest instrument you’ll ever own.
-Dance. Even if you have nowhere to do it but your living room.
Read the directions, even if you don’t follow them.
-Do not read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly!
-Get to know your parents. You never know when they’ll be gone for good.
-Be nice to your siblings. They’re your best link to your past and the people most likely to stick with you in the future.
-Understand that friends come and go, but with a precious few you should hold on.
Work hard to bridge the gaps in geography and lifestyle, because the older you get, the more you need the people who knew you when you were young.
-Live in “New York City” once, but leave before it makes you hard.

Live in “Northern California” once, but leave before it makes you soft.

-Accept certain inalienable truths: Prices will rise. Politicians will philander.

You, too, will get old.
And when you do, you’ll fantasize that when you were young, prices were reasonable, politicians were noble, and children respected their elders.
-Respect your elders.
-Don’t expect anyone else to support you.

Maybe you have a trust fund. Maybe you’ll have a wealthy spouse.
But you never know when either one might run out.
-Don’t mess too much with your hair or by the time you’re 40 it will look 85.
-Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it.

Advice is a form of nostalgia.
Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it’s worth.

But trust me on the sunscreen.

Violinist in the Metro – Ego Dialogues

This is an incredibly sad story which gave me chills.

It is a social experiment about perception, taste and priorities of people. A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that thousands of people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried up to meet his schedule. A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping continued to walk. A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work. The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on. In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the best musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written with a violin worth 3.5 million dollars. Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston and the seats average $100.

Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of an social experiment about perception, taste and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context? One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be: If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?

So many people do things because they are “fashionable” that they forget to look at things with their own eyes, listen with their own ears, and appreciate anything with their own hearts.

Home Sweet Home

On my drive home today, I had a lot of time to think….about my friends, family, love, career, the future.  The music was off and few phone calls were made.  It was just me and the beautiful open road.  I loved it!!

I was thinking how I have completely lost myself. I come from a small town where people seem to enjoy the simplest things in life.  It was all about high school football, good ol’ country music, and God.  I remembered how happy I was.  I took the yearbook camera everywhere I went, boys were the last thing on my mind, and community service was my passion.   Now, it seems like all I do is party, shop, and stress about how much I spend on the two.  What happened to that girl?  That girl who wanted to save the world.  The girl who wanted to live life with passion and motivated others to follow their dreams.  I get disgusted when my friends back at home look at me like I am successful.  I want to tell them that what I have, well, that’s not what life is about.  Life is about love.  I feel the most successful when I come home and I see my parents and my cute ba.  Sometimes, I just want to move  back home.  It would help my parents out, and I would be happy.    I feel comfort and secure here.

You know, I wasn’t suppose to come home today, but God knew I needed to. I love Him!  It’s like he knows when I am low and down, and he just points me to where I need to go to get my drive and motivation once again.

There are not a lot of things I like about myself.  However, the one thing I do like and admire about myself is my love for my family. I would do anything in the world for them!  My parents are the strongest people I have ever met.  As hard as they work and as many challenges God has put in their lives, I have NEVER heard them once stress or complain.   They always have a smile.  They always have the warmest hugs.  They always tell me everything is going to be ok.  I can’t wait to be the people that they are one day.  They don’t have the biggest bank accounts, but they have the biggest hearts I have ever seen.

I am going to change.  My mom made me realize today that I have lost something…my Faith.  I don’t trust anymore.  I forget that He is taking care of everything.   Okay, yeah I don’t like my job..WAH!  Yeah, I work 50+ hours,…WAH!  I mean, this should only be temporary until I figure out a new plan.  I should be soooo happy for eveything God has given to me!  I am so blessed.   It’s time for me to go back to ol’ me.  The girl who is happy dancing on the couch to oldies in a baggie t-shirt.  Yeah, I have a corporate America job and live in the city.  That shouldn’t define.  Yeah, I am not like all of my friends.  That shouldn’t influence me.  I should be me.  Well, she is here ya’ll!🙂 Hope you guys can handle it.

“You can take a girl out of the country, but not the country out of the girl!”

The Mayonnaise Jar & Two Beers

When things in your life seem almost too much to handle, when 24 hours in a day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and the two beers.


A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, he wordlessly picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.


The professor then picked up a box of small pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.


The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. He asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with an unanimous “yes”.


The professor then produced two beers from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar effectively filling the empty space between the sand. The students laughed.


“Now,” said the professor as the laughter subsided, “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things—your family, your children, your health, your friends and your favorite passions—and if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.”


“The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house and your car.”


“The sand is everything else—the small stuff. If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued, “there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls. The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you.”


“Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Spend time with your children. Spend time with your parents. Visit with grandparents. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your spouse out to dinner. Play another 18. There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal. Take care of the golf balls first—the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.”


One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the beer represented. The professor smiled and said, “I’m glad you asked.'”


“The beer just shows you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple of beers with a friend.”

Thanks For Your Time

A young man learns what’s most important in life from the guy next door.


It had been some time since Jack had seen the old man. College, girls, career, and life itself got in the way. In fact, Jack moved clear across the country in pursuit of his dreams.

There, in the rush of his busy life, Jack had little time to think about the past and often no time to spend with his wife and son. He was working on his future, and nothing could stop him.


Over the phone, his mother told him, “Mr. Belser died last night. The funeral is Wednesday.” Memories flashed through his mind like an old newsreel as he sat quietly remembering his childhood days.


“Jack, did you hear me?”

“Oh, sorry, Mom. Yes, I heard you. It’s been so long since I thought of him. I’m sorry, but I honestly thought he died years ago,” Jack said.

“Well, he didn’t forget you. Every time I saw him he’d ask how you were doing. He’d reminisce about the many days you spent over ‘his side of the fence’ as he put it,” Mom told him.

“I loved that old house he lived in,” Jack said.

“You know, Jack, after your father died, Mr. Belser stepped in to make sure you had a man’s influence in your life,” she said

“He’s the one who taught me carpentry,” he said. “I wouldn’t be in this business if it weren’t for him. He spent a lot of time teaching me things he thought were important…Mom, I’ll be there for the funeral,” Jack said.


As busy as he was, he kept his word. Jack caught the next flight to his hometown. Mr. Belser’s funeral was small and uneventful. He had no children of his own, and most of his relatives had passed away.

The night before he had to return home, Jack and his Mom stopped by to see the old house next door one more time.

Standing in the doorway, Jack paused for a moment. It was like crossing over into another dimension, a leap through space and time The house was exactly as he remembered. Every step held memories. Every picture, every piece of furniture….Jack stopped suddenly.


“What’s wrong, Jack?” his Mom asked.

“The box is gone,” he said

“What box?” Mom asked.

“There was a small gold box that he kept locked on top of his desk. I must have asked him a thousand times what was inside. All he’d ever tell me was ‘the thing I value most,'” Jack said.


It was gone. Everything about the house was exactly how Jack remembered it, except for the box. He figured someone from the Belser family had taken it.


“Now I’ll never know what was so valuable to him,” Jack said. “I better get some sleep. I have an early flight home, Mom.”


It had been about two weeks since Mr. Belser died Returning home from work one day Jack discovered a note in his mailbox. “Signature required on a package. No one at home. Please stop by the main post office within the next three days,” the note read.


Early the next day Jack retrieved the package. The small box was old and looked like it had been mailed a hundred years ago. The handwriting was difficult to read, but the return address caught his attention. “Mr. Harold Belser” it read. Jack took the box out to his car and ripped open the package. There inside was the gold box and an envelope. Jack’s hands shook as he read the note inside.


“Upon my death, please forward this box and its contents to Jack Bennett. It’s the thing I valued most in my life.” A small key was taped to the letter. His heart racing, as tears filling his eyes, Jack carefully unlocked the box. There inside he found a beautiful gold pocket watch.


Running his fingers slowly over the finely etched casing, he unlatched the cover. Inside he found these words engraved:


“Jack, Thanks for your time! -Harold Belser.”


“The thing he valued most was…my time”


Jack held the watch for a few minutes, then called his office and cleared his appointments for the next two days. “Why?” Janet, his assistant asked.


“I need some time to spend with my son,” he said.


“Oh, by the way, Janet, thanks for your time!”


Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away.

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –

Think about this. You may not realize it, but it’s 100% true:


  • At least 2 people in this world love you so much they would die for you.
  • At least 10 people in this world love you in some way.
  • A smile from you can bring happiness to anyone, even if they don’t like you.
  • Every night, SOMEONE thinks about you before they go to sleep.
  • You mean the world to someone.
  • If not for you, someone may not be living.
  • You are special and unique.
  • When you think you have no chance of getting what you want, you probably won’t get it, but if you trust God to do what’s best, and wait on His time, sooner or later, you will get it or something better
  • When you make the biggest mistake ever, something good can still come from it.
  • When you think the world has turned its back on you, take a look: you most likely turned your back on the world.
  • Someone that you don’t even know exists loves you.
  • Always remember the compliments you received. Forget about the rude remarks.
  • Always tell someone how you feel about them; you will feel much better when they know and you’ll both be happy .
  • If you have a great friend, take the time to let them know that they are great.

Ain’t no reason…

Last week I started running outdoors in preparation for my first half-marathon at the end of March. It was a really cold day and I had to force myself to go outdoors as opposed to the treadmill at the gym. I’m glad I did because it would have meant missing out on meeting a most interesting person.

Barely a mile into my run I see an old man walking ahead on the sidewalk. At first I was shocked to think that an elderly person would be out on such a chilly day. As I got closer I slowed down to a walk and said hello. Felt awkward at first, greeting a complete stranger on the side of the road. But I am glad I did, cos thirty minutes later I find myself still talking to Mr Saito. I could probably write for hours on what Jurou and I talked about for that short half hour. I was amazed at his pure will to live. He is 69 years old, three months from his 70th birthday and still enjoys each day to the fullest of his abilities.

He told me that his name, Jurou means “ten” and “son”. Him being the tenth and final son his father had from his 3 wives! One thing Mr Saito has experienced in life is loss. Of his 16 siblings, he is the only living son and has two sisters who both still live in Japan. Hearing about his life and the struggles he has endured definately put a lot of things in my life into perspective. Learning that he lost almost half his family before he was even 20 years old really hit me with how fragile life is.

I understand that people die everyday, it’s natural. We are born only to die, that is the only true constant in life. I think, no, I know that almost all people our age don’t really understand this. It isn’t until you lose somebody or experience such tragedy or hardship that you begin to understand the sacredness of what we have all been blessed with.

Most of us are extremely fortunate to lead relativley comfortable lives, yet we take it for granted in pursuit of education, careers, relationships, families. I understand that all these things are the foundations that we build our lives on, but how much do we really appreciate it all?

I’m not finished but I’m publishing this as my first post to this blog anyways cos it has taken me two weeks to get this far with a post. There’s so much more to come….

Ain’t no reason things are this way, it’s how they’ve always been and they intend to stay, I can’t explain why we live this way, we do it everyday…

– Kizzy

My First One :)

So today, I got asked a really important question.  It made me think hard and long, and with the little experience on “love”  that I have, I couldn’t think of anything but a politically correct answer.  All my answers are politically correct by the way.  I just always think that’s what people want to hear and it’s what makes you look intellectual.  Well, I have learn to say “I just don’t know.”  Because when I bullshit my answer, it comes from the crap and false perceptions from the media.  Well, I realized that you can’t find life answers in books, tvs, and music.  It’s our individual experiences.  Yeah, all those things help us cope, but each one of us has our own story, perspective, and ending that no one really can define for us.

So, exactly what was I asked: Why is love so damn hard?  Why is it that when you find someone who you want to be with, that being actually being with them seems to be the hardest part?

Well, I wish I had the answer.  All I can do is pose more questions.

Is it us? I mean is something wrong with us?  Or is it them?  Well, maybe its the whole labels thing?  People don’t like to put a status on it.  Or maybe we are just going after the wrong ones.  The ones that we know we can’t ever have and we are setting ourselves to get hurt?  Maybe love isn’t the person that sweeps you off your feet, but the one that you can just say, “yeah i can live with them,” with a sluggish attitude.  Or maybe we just make oursleves like people so we are not lonely?  But honestly, I am not afraid to be alone.  Yeah, I mean I don’t want to, but I think it doesn’t scare me.  Why is it in human nature we need to feel so loved and nurtured?  And not only by just somebody, but a specific someone.  Is it culture that tells us we have one soul mate?  Or our we compatible with lots of people?

I don’t know maybe you guys have some answers.

Now, I am back to working my life away.